Articles by: Ararat Gocmen

The Sanders Offensive

The Sanders Offensive

The Democratic primary race isn’t a struggle between competing theories of change. It is instead a struggle between competing visions—one defensive, the other offensive—of how the Democratic Party should respond to the historical moment in which we find ourselves today. U.S. political discourse has moved consistently rightward over the past few decades, during which evangelical Christian and libertarian conservatism have thrived as New-Deal-era progressivism has effectively disappeared from mainstream politics.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a rally demanding presidential action to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Sanders will run to Hillary Clinton's left, trying to elevate economic issues.

Recalibrating Progressivism

Today’s American Left should view Sanders’ embrace of the United States’ populist-progressive tradition with a degree of skepticism. Though such a movement has the potential to gain mass support in an era of socioeconomic stratification not seen since the Gilded Age, Sanders’ populist politics should temper his supporters’ excitement regarding the “revolutionary” potential of his attempted crusade. Populism has simply disappointed too often throughout American history, failing to ever fundamentally change the system it has sought to challenge.

Yanis the Man-is

Yanis the Man-is

In its embodiment of the experience of the radicalized academic-turned-policymaker, Yanis’s career exemplifies the ideal path through which young, aspiring American and European intellectuals of the left can gain real political authority: by leveraging scholarly successes in some policy-relevant field in order to ascend to positions of direct political power.